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David Russell

TO LIFE!

August 24, 2007 at 12:33 PM

Having recently returned from teaching at Keshet Eilon in Israel, I find myself reflecting on matters of:

LIFE!

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FRIENDS!

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THE SPIRIT RENEWED!
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I'm rather at a loss to describe the wonderful experience of Keshet Eilon. But, I know I am quite grateful for it!


From Jim W. Miller
Posted on August 24, 2007 at 1:45 PM
When there was a thread about this, I was wondering how welcome non-Jewish people feel. Usually at gatherings that are predominantly one ethnicity there are good folks who don't want anyone else there.
From David Russell
Posted on August 24, 2007 at 2:03 PM
Jim,

Keshet is the Hebrew word for "Bow". It serves for the violin bow, the archer's bow and the bow of a bridge (as in between cultures, races, religions,etc.)
One of the missions of Keshet Eilon is to host violinists of all nationalities, races,etc. in Israel to the betterment of all. I have always felt welcomed there. They are good people.

From Jim W. Miller
Posted on August 24, 2007 at 4:36 PM
One pleasant thing about musicians in general is that generally they're inclined to bridge between cultures. It sort of comes with the territory.
From Pieter Viljoen
Posted on August 24, 2007 at 5:30 PM
Jim, I'm not Jewish and I never felt unwelcome there. Keshet is mainly made up of Russians, Israelis, then all of Rashkovsky and Andrievsky's students from UK. It's a pretty mixed bag, and only some of the Russians stuck to themselves.
From Jim W. Miller
Posted on August 24, 2007 at 6:42 PM
Ah. A case of wrong impression about the demographics then. That's no good :)
From Linda L
Posted on August 24, 2007 at 7:50 PM
I love the third to last picture. The pink really contrasts against the skies nicely.
From David Russell
Posted on August 24, 2007 at 9:22 PM
Pieter,

I also had a student from Turkey and a Christian Arab this summer. In the past, I taught several Korean students there, and there was a prominent teacher from China, as well. The demographic expands...

From Pieter Viljoen
Posted on August 24, 2007 at 10:00 PM
Yea, it's more international than anything you'll find in the states, besides maybe Marlboro.

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